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Urge President Obama to End the U.S. Boycott of the Conference on Racism

A series of article have surfaced, urging the Obama administration to attend the United Nations' Durban Review conference.

Marlene Nadle writes in "Will Obama be a no-go to racism conference?" that "President Barack Obama's position on attending the conference translates roughly into: Do it our way or we won't play. He has already gotten all references to Israel, to reparations for slavery, and to a proposed ban on speech defaming any religion dropped from the conference's draft document. Yet, he is still unwilling to have the United States attend. Even if the administration bullies its way into getting its final points, it is not really a win for the United States." 

In "Race and the Obama Administration," the actor and activist Danny Glover writes, "This should be a moment for the United States to rejoin the global struggle against racism, the struggle that the Bush administration so arrogantly abandoned. I hope President Obama will agree that the United States must participate with other nations in figuring out the tough issues of how to overcome racism and other forms of discrimination and intolerance, and how to provide repair to victims. Our country certainly has much to learn; and maybe, for the first time in a long time, we have something by way of leadership to share with the rest of the world in continuing our long struggle to overcome." 

And Aisha Brown writes in the Washington DC Examiner that:

"With only a week until the April 20-24, 2009, Durban Review Conference the Obama administration has yet to reverse its decision despite requests from leaders of the G-20, the European Union, and the African Diaspora.  A choice that will decidedly negate the recent strides made in U.S. foreign diplomacy.

"During his first European tour; the president spoke candidly about the United States’ past arrogance humbled himself at the world’s stage.  However, if Mr. Obama is expected to repair America’s tarnished reputation, he must acknowledge and act upon his campaign promises.  He must be a president of both style and substance. 

"Although the 2008 election represents an unprecedented civil rights victory for this nation; President Obama's mere presence at the highest level of State is not enough to absolve centuries of racism and oppression.  We need our president to actively pursue 'the path of a more perfect union' at home and abroad.

"To Urge President Obama to Send an Official U.S. Delegation to the Durban Review Conference Please Contact the White House Comment Line at 202-456-1111."

11:22 am edt          Comments


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In partnership with: LUNDU Center for Afro-Peruvian Advancement 
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