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News, views and events detailing the Black presence in the Americas.

This website is designed to keep you up to date on Life in the Black Americas.  

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Wednesday, January 14, 2009

CUBA:  Racism - "Taboo, Complicated and Thorny" Issue

"The persistence of racism in Cuba is disturbing to some of the island's thinkers, who are calling for a debate on the problem in this country, where equal rights have not guaranteed equal opportunities for all social groups," Patricia Grogg writes in an article for IPS.

"The first documentary on racial discrimination in this Caribbean island nation was filmed here in 2008, incorporating opinions from well-known artists and intellectuals that go to the heart of the controversy. 'Raza' (Race), by young filmmaker Eric Corvalán, could serve as a starting-point to launch the long-delayed debate.

" 'So far, racism has only been talked about in academia, among intellectuals. I think there should be an open, public discussion, even in parliament,' the 36-year-old Corvalán told IPS.

" 'In 50 years (since the revolution), women's issues and homosexuality have been debated: why hasn't racism?' asked the filmmaker. 'It's a revolutionary topic that concerns everyone, because there are black women, black homosexuals and black men.' "

12:45 am est 

Afro-Brazilian Religions Battle New Threats

Mario Osava of IPS writes about the continuing persecutions of Afro Brazilians who try to practice their traditional Candomblé: "Millions of Brazilians usher in the new year by wading into the sea, dressed in white, scattering flowers on the water as an offering to the Afro-Brazilian deity Iemanjá, in return for her blessings for the year to come. But few of them realize that this tradition is rooted in a religion fighting for survival in the face of prejudice, racism and intolerance.

"Jaciara Ribeiro dos Santos symbolizes the counterattack launched by practitioners of Candomblé and other African-based religions, which have survived centuries of repression only to confront a new wave of attacks by fundamentalist Protestant churches.

"Jaciara's mother, Gildasia dos Santos, was better known as Mae Gilda (Mother Gilda) in her role as a 'ialorixá' or Candomblé priestess. She lived in Salvador, capital of the northeastern Brazilian state of Bahia, home to the country's largest population of African descendants.

"In September 1999, Mae Gilda saw her photograph printed in the Folha Universal, a daily newspaper published by the 'neo-Pentecostal' Universal Church of the Kingdom of God, under a headline accusing her of being a 'charlatan' and of endangering the "lives and wallets" of her followers.

"Jaciara is convinced that her mother's death by a heart attack several months later, at the age of 65, was a direct result of the psychological trauma caused by the slanderous attack.

"The case drew widespread publicity, and January 21, the date of Mae Gilda's death, was designated as the National Day Against Religious Intolerance, through a presidential decree adopted two years ago."

12:34 am est 


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Visit www.afropresencia.com to find listings and links to areas where you can find out about upcoming events, as well as links to articles, photos and videos on Life in the Black Americas.



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The Sound of My Footsteps:

Narratives of Migratory Jamaican immigrants

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Interviews with over 30 Jamaican immigrants

on their pre-migratory perceptions of New York

and England

 Click here to view and purchase the book.

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The Afro-Latin@ Reader focuses attention on a large, vibrant, yet oddly invisible community in the United States: people of African descent from Latin America and the Caribbean. The presence of Afro-Latin@s in the United States (and throughout the Americas) belies the notion that Blacks and Latin@s are two distinct categories or cultures. Afro-Latin@s are uniquely situated to bridge the widening social divide between Latin@s and African Americans. At the same time, their experiences reveal pervasive racism among Latin@s and ethnocentrism among African Americans. Offering insight into Afro-Latin@ life and new ways to understand culture, ethnicity, nation, identity, and antiracist politics, The Afro-Latin@ Reader presents a kaleidoscopic view of Black Latin@s in the United States. It addresses history, music, gender, class, and media representations in more than sixty selections, including scholarly essays, memoirs, newspaper and magazine articles, poetry, short stories, and interviews.

 Click here to view and purchase the book.

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African American History Day by Day: A Reference Guide to Events

 by Karen Juanita Carrillo

The proof of any group's importance to history is in the detail, a fact made plain by this informative book's day-by-day documentation of the impact of African Americans on life in the United States.  One of the easiest ways to grasp any aspect of history is to look at it as a continuum. African American History Day by Day: A Reference Guide to Events provides just such an opportunity.

 Click here to view and purchase the book.

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The View from Chocó: The Afro-Colombian past, their lives in the present, and their hopes for the future 

by Karen Juanita Carrillo

 The View from Chocó: The Afro-Colombian past, their lives in the present, and their hopes for the future is an introduction to the lives of Blacks in Colombia. Afro-Colombians live in a resource-rich yet remote region of Colombia. They only recently won recognition as one of that nation's distinct ethnic groups. But Colombia's on-going civil war has led many Afro-Colombians to reach even farther than their nation's borders for recognition: many have made their way to the United States as refugees and as political activists working for peace in their homeland. The View from Chocó introduces the lives and struggles of a too-long neglected community of Colombian Blacks. 

 Click here to view and purchase the book.

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To view and purchase Kindle books, please click the following links:

The View from Chocó: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009LSSNLU

BIBLIOGRAPHY OF LIFE IN THE BLACK AMERICAS: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00AVE92J0

 

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